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Post Index » STAGE TECHNIC » Pro Sound


Media College (Chương 1 : Âm Thanh) (3,4) - Page 6 PDF Print E-mail
Written by tuyenphuc   
Saturday, 13 March 2010 08:47
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Sound Mixers: Subgroups

Subgroups are a way to "pre-mix" a number of channels on a sound console before sending them to the master output mix. In the following diagram, channels 1 and 2 are assigned directly to the master output bus. Channels 3,4,5 and 6 are assigned to subgroup 1, which in turn is assigned to the master output.

 77

Subgroups have many uses and advantages, the most obvious being that you can pre-mix (sub-mix) groups of inputs.

For example, if you have six backing vocalists you can set up a good mix just for them, balancing each voice to get a nice overall effect. If you then send all six channels to one subgroup, you can adjust all backing vocals with a single subgroup slider while still maintaining the balance between the individual voices.

Note that if your mixing console's subgroups are mono, you will need to use them in pairs to maintain a stereo effect. For each pair, one subgroup is the left channel and the other is right. Each channel can be panned across the two subgroups, while the subgroups are panned completely left and right into the master output bus.

Sound Mixers: Outputs

The main output from most mixing devices is a stereo output, using two output sockets which should be fairly obvious and easy to locate. The connectors are usually 3-pin XLRs on larger consoles, but can also be 6.5mm TR (jack) sockets or RCA sockets.

The level of the output signal is monitored on the mixer's VU meters. The ideal is for the level to peak at around 0dB or just below. However you should note that the dB scale is relative and 0dB on one mixer may not be the same as 0dB on another mixer or audio device. For this reason it is important to understand how each device in the audio chain is referenced, otherwise you may find that your output signal is unexpectedly high or low when it reaches the next point in the chain.

In professional circles, the nominal level of 0dB is considered to be +4 dBu. Consumer-level equipment tends to use -10 dBV.

The best way to check the levels of different equipment is to use audio test tone. Send 0dB tone from the desk and measure it at the next point in the chain.

Many mixers include a number of additional outputs, for example:

Monitor Feed: A dedicated monitor feed which can be adjusted independently of the master output.

Headphones: The headphone output may be the same as the monitor feed, or you may be able to select separate sources to listen to.

Auxiliary Sends: The output(s) of the mixer's auxiliary channels.

Subgroup Outputs: Some consoles have the option to output each subgroup independently.

Communication Channels: Some consoles have additional output channels available for communicating with the stage, recording booths, etc.

Sound Mixers: Outputs

The main output from most mixing devices is a stereo output, using two output sockets which should be fairly obvious and easy to locate. The connectors are usually 3-pin XLRs on larger consoles, but can also be 6.5mm TR (jack) sockets or RCA sockets.

The level of the output signal is monitored on the mixer's VU meters. The ideal is for the level to peak at around 0dB or just below. However you should note that the dB scale is relative and 0dB on one mixer may not be the same as 0dB on another mixer or audio device. For this reason it is important to understand how each device in the audio chain is referenced, otherwise you may find that your output signal is unexpectedly high or low when it reaches the next point in the chain.

In professional circles, the nominal level of 0dB is considered to be +4 dBu. Consumer-level equipment tends to use -10 dBV.

The best way to check the levels of different equipment is to use audio test tone. Send 0dB tone from the desk and measure it at the next point in the chain.

Many mixers include a number of additional outputs, for example:

Monitor Feed: A dedicated monitor feed which can be adjusted independently of the master output.

Headphones: The headphone output may be the same as the monitor feed, or you may be able to select separate sources to listen to.

Auxiliary Sends: The output(s) of the mixer's auxiliary channels.

Subgroup Outputs: Some consoles have the option to output each subgroup independently.

Communication Channels: Some consoles have additional output channels available for communicating with the stage, recording booths, etc.

(Xin xem tiếp Phần 5: Chất lượng Âm thanh, Sound Quality).

 

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